Profiles

Pam Gilbert


pamela gilbert


Albert Brick Professor of English


contact

Email: pgilbert@ufl.edu


Website: http://www.english.ufl.edu
/faculty/pgilbert/index.html

Pamela K. Gilbert has published widely in the areas of Victorian literature, cultural studies and the history of medicine. Her particular research interests have been in metaphors of disease and the cultural history of epidemics in nineteenth century Britain, particularly cholera. She has been a research associate at the Welcome Institute for the History of Medicine, at the University College of London, and recently held a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Edinburgh, where she researched the contributions of anatomist and neurologist Charles Bell, to the history of emotion and facial expression. Her current work is on skin in the nineteenth century, in medicine, literature, psychology, evolution and popular culture. She is also interested in the intersections of culture and clinical medicine in the present day. Her books include Disease, Desire and the Body in Victorian Women’s Popular Novels (Cambridge UP 1997), Mapping the Victorian Social Body (SUNY Press, 2004), The Citizen’s Body (Ohio State UP, 2007), and Cholera and Nation (SUNY Press, 2008). Her more recent essays include “Disease and the Body,” in The Victorian World; "'A Nation of Good Animals’: Popular Beliefs and the Body,” in A Cultural History of the Body; and the forthcoming “Women and Medicine in the Age of Empire,” in The Cultural History of Women in The Age of Empire (1800-1920).



Paulette Hahn, M.D.

paulette hahn, M.d.


Clinical Asst. Professor of
Rheumatology


contact

Email: Paulette.Hahn@medicine.ufl.edu


Website: http://rheumatology.medicine.ufl.edu/about-us/division-faculty
/paulette-christine-hahn-m-d/


Paulette Hahn is a physician in the UF Department of Medicine and Division of Rheumatology. She is currently active in both patient care and medical education. Her experience as a nurse prior to entering medicine, nurtured her interest in inter-professional health care collaboration, and she continues to meld the practice of nursing and medicine. She has taught courses in biomedical ethics, evidence-based medicine, Interdisciplinary Family Health, and Introduction to Clinical Medicine with a focus on communication and patient-centered interviewing. She has a longstanding interest in medical humanities that enhances the understanding of the patient and family life experience.


Dr. Hahn’s other educational involvement includes her work as portfolio advisor for the Medicine Clerkship, which incorporates reflection as a key pedagogical method. She is interested in enhancing the physical diagnostic process and critical thinking through the arts, utilizing concepts from the classic work of Rudolf Arnheim in Visual Thinking and Art and Visual Perception. She has designed an elective for medical students, The Art and Scholarship of Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Reasoning, with a capstone educational experience in visualization and observation at the Harn Museum of Art. She was inducted into the Chapman Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society, and received the American College of Rheumatology Clinician Scholar Educator three-year Grant Award, which has allowed her to develop a curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents.



Mitchell Hart

mitchell hart


Alexander Grass Chair in Jewish History


contact

Email: hartm@history.ufl.edu


Website: http://history.ufl.edu/directory/current-faculty/mitchell-b-hart/



Mitchell Hart researches and teaches about the history of race and medicine, with a particular focus on the nexus of Jewish/Christian history and religion. In 2007, he published The Healthy Jew: The Symbiosis of Judaism and Modern Medicine, and is now working on a book tentatively titled Sarah's Syphilis: The Bible in the Modern Medical Imagination, which looks at the extensive literature produced by physicians over the past three centuries about the diseases suffered by Biblical characters.



Kostas Kapparis

KOSTAS KAPPARIS


Associate Professor, Classics


Director, Center for Greek Studies


contact

Email: kapparis@ufl.edu


Website: http://web.clas.ufl.edu
/users/kapparis/Kostas1.html


Kostas Kapparis is a classical scholar and social historian. His research interests include gender studies and the history of ancient medicine and science, especially the study of ancient Embryology. He has published one book on Abortion in the Ancient World, several articles on topics related to ancient embryology, and is currently working on a textual edition with commentary of two studies on fetal life from the Roman period. The bulk of his work is related to the value attached to fetal life in the first three centuries of Christianity, and the impact that contemporary perceptions of antenatal life have had in the subsequent formation of Christian views on embryonic life and its termination. He is also working on a project on monsters and the boundaries between science and myth in the Natural History of Pliny and Aelian’s Animal Stories, from the point of view that those boundaries are fluid and what was perceived to be scientific knowledge in the ancient world actually fueled the imagination and generated nightmarish monsters. Kostas is a regular reviewer for the Journal for the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. At UF he is teaching a graduate seminar on Greek and Roman medical authors studied in the original Greek and Latin (Hippocrates, Galen, Soranus, Rufus of Ephesus, Erasistratus, Scribonius Largus and Celsus). He has been a member of the Southern Association for the History of Medicine and Science (SAHMS) since 2001 and he is currently serving as Chair of the Publications Committee of SAHMS.



Peter Rudnytsky

peter rudnytsky


Professor, English


MSW


Licensed Clinical Social Worker


contact

Email: plr@ufl.edu


Website: http://www.english.ufl.edu
/faculty/prudnytsky/index.html


Peter L. Rudnytsky received a Ph.D. from Yale. He joined the University of Florida faculty in 1992. Trained as a Renaissance scholar, Professor Rudnytsky’s current areas of specialization include Freud, the history and theory of psychoanalysis, and psychoanalytic approaches to literature. He is the author of Freud and Oedipus (Columbia, 1987); The Psychoanalytic Vocation: Rank, Winnicott, and the Legacy of Freud (Yale, 1991); Psychoanalytic Conversations: Interviews with Clinicians, Commentators, and Critics (Analytic, 2000); and Reading Psychoanalysis: Freud, Rank, Ferenczi, Groddeck (Cornell, 2002). His most recent book is Rescuing Psychoanalysis from Freud and Other Essays in Re-Vision (Karnac, 2011). Among his numerous edited and co-edited books are Transitional Objects and Potential Spaces: Literary Uses of D. W. Winnicott (Columbia, 1993), Freud and Forbidden Knowledge (NYU, 1994), Ferenczi’s Turn in Psychoanalysis (NYU, 1996), Psychoanalyses/Feminisms (SUNY, 2000), Psychoanalysis and Narrative Medicine (SUNY, 2008), and Her Hour Come Round at Last: A Garland for Nina Coltart (Karnac, 2011).


In 2011, Professor Rudnytsky launched two new book series: The History of Psychoanalysis, with Professor Brett Kahr, published by Karnac Books; and Psychoanalytic Interventions, with Professor Esther Rashkin, published by Fordham University Press. Professor Rudnytsky serves on the editorial boards of The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, The Psychoanalytic Review, Psychoanalytic Psychology, American Journal of Psychoanalysis, and Psychoanalysis and History.


Committed both personally and professionally to integrating the academic and clinical worlds of psychoanalysis, Professor Rudnytsky received an MSW from Florida State University in 2008 and is currently a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of Florida with a part-time private practice in Gainesville.



Jill S

Jill Sonke


contact

Email: jsonke@arts.ufl.edu


Website: http://www.ufl.edu/2010/03/04/jill-sonke/



Jill Sonke is director of the Center for the Arts in Medicine at the University of Florida (UF) and Assistant Director of UF Health Shands Arts in Medicine. She serves on the faculty of the UF Center for Arts in Medicine, and is an affiliated faculty member in the School of Theatre & Dance, the Center for African Studies, and the Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration. With over 20 years of experience and leadership in arts in medicine, Jill is active in research, curriculum and program development, international cultural exchange, and is a past president and Distinguished Fellow of the Global Alliance for Arts & Health. Her current research focuses on dance and Parkinson's disease, the impact of arts programming on medical-surgical care and nursing retention, and the effect of music on cost and quality of care in emergency medicine. Jill is the recipient of a New Forms Florida Fellowship Award, a State of Florida Individual Artist Fellowship Award, an Excellence in Teaching Award from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development, a UF Internationalizing the Curriculum Award, a UF Most Outstanding Service Learning Faculty Award, and over ninety grants for her programs and research at the University of Florida.



Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig

nina stoyan-rosenzweig


Director, Medical Humanities at UF
College of Medicine


contact

Email: nstoyan@ufl.edu


Website: http://hmig.med.ufl.edu
/about/nina-stoyan-rosenzweig/


Nina Stoyan-Rosenzweig is archivist and historian at the Health Science Center Libraries and director of medical humanities for the College of Medicine. Trained as an ecologist/evolutionary biologist and historian she has taught courses in history (a variety of topics including the history of medicine), medical humanities and narrative medicine, sustainability, environmental studies, physician-patient relationship and clinical interviewing, biomedical ethics, biology, English composition, integrative medicine, and arts in healthcare. She has developed programs and curriculum in the medical humanities locally and nationally and has focused on developing medical humanities and arts as means of promoting humanism in medicine. To this end she has served on committees for the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, as well as judge for the Gold Foundation Essay Contest since 2008. She also collaborates with local organizations such as the Cade Museum, and the ACLD. In addition to her interests in humanism in medicine and using humanities to develop clinical skills, her research interests include history of botanicals and human domestication of plants, history and impact of infectious disease, political and social ideology and their impact on eugenics programs, environmental history and the impact of natural environments on humans, human-animal relationships, as well as the history of medical education. She is involved in a number of projects including an oral history project interviewing polio survivors, a book project on the history of the College of Medicine at UF, narratives and and exhibits related to the medicinal plants, health and the Panama Canal and health impacts of reviving Native Hawaiian culture.